Root

sky roots
(Click photo to see larger version)

Mid-March at this latitude is a time when even the most ordinary things can seem like revelations, as the Theriomorph observes. There is both less and more of things than we remember. Upturned roots diminished by rot seem to draw sustenance directly from the clouds, while living roots on a stream bank eroded by floods are left clutching little but each other and a few, bare rocks. As we circle, examining them from all angles, these signs turn gradually into ciphers. Soon we risk our own entrapment in a spell of undiscovery. Did she really say, “Even the babies have rocks in their parts”? What does it mean?


(Video from the Undiscovery Channel)

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A couple of housekeeping notes: I’ve introduced a Feedburner version of the RSS feed for this site, the main advantage of which is that it displays videos to subscribers. Sometimes, as with that skunk video in “Canoe Creek,” I forget to include a note or caption to tell people reading this via Bloglines, Google Reader, or wherever that there’s a video in the post. And why make them click through to view it, after all? Other advantages to the new feed include helpful links to share the post via email, Facebook, and so on, similar to what you have on-site with the ShareThis utility. I’ve made it the new default, meaning that it’s what you’ll get if you click on the little feed icon in the Firefox browser window.

And speaking of the browser window, if you’ve noticed a question mark inside a yellow warning triangle to the left of the URL, don’t be alarmed — that’s simply my new favicon. (Don’t like it? Design me another one!) It used to be an exclamation point, but it was subjected to rigorous questioning in Photoshop. If you can’t see the new favicon, and are still still looking at the old, nearly indecipherable one (which was supposed to be a “falling rocks ahead” sign, but looked more like a sideways “V”), that’s probably because your browser is still caching the old one. Don’t worry — you’re not missing much.

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Dave Bonta (bio) crowd-sources his problems by following his gut, which he shares with 100 trillion of his closest microbial friends — a close-knit, symbiotic community comprising several thousand species of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. In a similarly collaborative fashion, all of Dave's writing is available for reuse and creative remix under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. For attribution in printed material, his name (Dave Bonta) will suffice, but for web use, please link back to the original. Contact him for permission to waive the "share alike" provision (e.g. for use in a conventionally copyrighted work).

7 Comments


  1. I thought she said, “rocks in their hearts”. But I have tinny little speakers, so it’s hard to tell.

    Reply

  2. That’s what I thought, too — and I have good speakers — but she corrected me in the comments for the video.

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  3. I see the question mark in the triangle. I feel so behind the times about feedburning and favicons. The intricacies and idiosyncracies of the blogging world are zipping past me. Features take a back seat to posts, and I can hardly come up with a word these days. I’m glad you experiment.

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  4. Thanks for the link, Dave – and I love ‘sky roots.’ Gorgeous. Could fall right into that one (and sometimes do, walking through the woods; get utterly stuck by a reveal of soething like this, reflections and roots, multiple worlds apparent at once). Love it.

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  5. robin andrea – Just between you and me, I don’t really understand any of it either. I’ve just learned the lingo.

    Theriomorph – Just for you, I’ve uploaded a new plugin that will give readers the ability to edit their own comments for a set time after commenting (currently set to 15 minutes). I’m anxious to see how y’all like it.

    Oh, and I’m glad you liked that photo!

    Reply

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