How to question authority

This entry is part 34 of 39 in the series Manual

Loudly, so the police sirens will be abashed.

Softly, so your blood-sucking interrogator will lean in close where he can be asphyxiated by your garlic breath.

From within, so the authorities will begin to doubt themselves.

From beyond the grave, which affords some form of protection against reprisal.

Through the slogan NO, which, as nitric oxide, reduces blood pressure by expanding the veins during its brief half-life in the bloodstream.

Through songs, which spread by invisible spores and can grow six inches in a day.

In the voice of unreason, since all the reasonable men defer to whomever commands the most barking guns.

Casually, as if walking on hot coals.

Automatically, through negative phototropism.

Surreptitiously, linking to your co-conspirators only through quantum entanglement.

With an absense of authority, which calls the very logic of authority structures into question.

Joyously. Because otherwise what’s the point?

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Dave Bonta (bio) crowd-sources his problems by following his gut, which he shares with 100 trillion of his closest microbial friends — a close-knit, symbiotic community comprising several thousand species of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. In a similarly collaborative fashion, all of Dave's writing is available for reuse and creative remix under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. For attribution in printed material, his name (Dave Bonta) will suffice, but for web use, please link back to the original. Contact him for permission to waive the "share alike" provision (e.g. for use in a conventionally copyrighted work).

4 Comments


  1. “Why?” Is the question that authoritarians loathe.
    The most powerful question in the world, Dave : )

    Reply

  2. Wonderful in whole, lovely in part. Love the negative phototropism, which is an idea that I’ve loved for sometime now, since it hints at, as other scientific findings do, such as astronomical obfusctory dust, or “dark matter” for that matter, the promise of the absence of light, which is mass and substance. A wonderful and true via negativa, that is followed by vines.

    Reply

    1. Hmm, I hadn’t thought of it in terms of the via negativa. Of course, my comparison raises the question: Is authority really all that similiar to light? Doesn’t that actually give it far more weight than it deserves?

      Reply

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