Sea Kale

sea kale

I’m currently camping in Scotland, whence the lack of new blog posts. In the meantime, here’s a photo of some sea kale on a pebbly beach on the south coast of England, which I visited briefly eight days ago. The new leaves were surprisingly mild and tasty raw.

Clapham-Junction

South of London, the rails branch alarmingly at Clapham Junction — the busiest train station in Europe, with 2000 trains passing through each day. At such places, it’s easy to believe that everyone is on their way somewhere else.

Newhaven harbor view

The harbor at Newhaven, however, is refreshingly free of places catering to the tourist crowd.

Newhaven harbor

Those who do go there for a spot of sun and sea don’t seem in much more of a hurry than the sea kale.

Arduous camping, version 2

They’ve been a great inspiration to me this past week.

Posted in ,
Dave Bonta (bio) crowd-sources his problems by following his gut, which he shares with 100 trillion of his closest microbial friends — a close-knit, symbiotic community comprising several thousand species of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. In a similarly collaborative fashion, all of Dave's writing is available for reuse and creative remix under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. For attribution in printed material, his name (Dave Bonta) will suffice, but for web use, please link back to the original. Contact him for permission to waive the "share alike" provision (e.g. for use in a conventionally copyrighted work).

7 Comments


  1. Camping in Scotland! How delightful. On our honeymoon fifteen years ago, Ethan and I spent some time camping in Iceland and in Scotland. I’d love to return to both.

    Wonderful photos, too.

    I’ve never had sea kale. Am intrigued now…

    Reply

    1. I don’t know whether it’s a regular culinary item or not. Clive Hicks-Jenkins served us samphire when we visited him in Wales the other week, and that was delicious.

      Needless to say, Rachel and I would love to go camping in Iceland someday! But Scotland has the added advantage of at least a few extant forests.

      Reply

  2. That’s a wonderful hammock perch. Two pairs of sandals means one got up to snap the photo. :) Thanks for sharing your wonderful ramblings.

    Reply

Leave a Reply