Plaint

Lord’s day. My wife being much in pain, I went this morning to Dr. Williams (who had cured her once before of this business), in Holborn, and he did give me an ointment which I sent home by my boy, and a plaster which I took with me to Westminster (having called and seen my mother in the morning as I went to the doctor), where I dined with Mr. Sheply (my Lord dining at Kensington).
After dinner to St. Margaret’s, where the first time I ever heard Common Prayer in that Church. I sat with Mr. Hill in his pew; Mr. Hill that married in Axe Yard and that was aboard us in the Hope. Church done I went and Mr. Sheply to see W. Howe at Mr. Pierces, where I staid singing of songs and psalms an hour or two, and were very pleasant with Mrs. Pierce and him. Thence to my Lord’s, where I staid and talked and drank with Mr. Sheply. After that to Westminster stairs, where I saw a fray between Mynheer Clinke, a Dutchman, that was at Hartlibb’s wedding, and a waterman, which made good sport. After that I got a Gravesend boat, that was come up to fetch some reed on this side the bridge, and got them to carry me to the bridge, and so home, where I found my wife.
After prayers I to bed to her, she having had a very bad night of it. This morning before I was up Will came home pretty well again, he having been only weary with riding, which he is not used to.

My pain, give me
an ointment, a plaster.
My mother.
The common axe
pierces, singing
between wedding and grave.


Erasure poem derived from The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Sunday 5 August 1660.

3 Comments


  1. The common axe/pierces,singing/between wedding and grave
    – what an amazing passage. I read it first thing this morning and it has haunted me all day.

    Reply

    1. Hey, thanks! I think my push to get caught up on Pepys has led me to out a little further than usual. Glad you like the results.

      Reply

Leave a Reply