The dying ocean

To Whitehall and there with Mr. Creed took a most pleasant walk for two hours in the park, which is now a very fine place.
Here we had a long and candid discourse one to another of one another’s condition, and he giving me an occasion I told him of my intention to get 60l. paid me by him for a gratuity for my labour extraordinary at sea. Which he did not seem unwilling to, and therefore I am very glad it is out.
To my Lord’s, where we found him newly come from Hinchingbroke, where he left my uncle very well, but my aunt not likely to live.
I staid and dined with him. He took me aside, and asked me what the world spoke of the King’s marriage. Which I answering as one that knew nothing, he enquired no further of me. But I do perceive by it that there is something in it that is ready to come out that the world knows not of yet.
After dinner into London to Mrs. Turner’s and my father’s, made visits and then home, where I sat late making of my journal for four days past, and so to bed.

A most pleasant ark
is the sea, which
did not seem ill,
there or here, but
like a king that knew
nothing of the world.


Erasure poem derived from The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Saturday 9 March 1660/61.

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