Discursive strategy

At the office all the morning private with Sir G. Carteret (who I expected something from about yesterday’s business, but he said nothing), Sir W. Batten, and Sir W. Pen, about drawing up an answer to several demands of my Lord Treasurer, and late at it till 2 o’clock. Then to dinner, and my wife to Sir W. Pen’s, and so to the office again and sat till late; and so home, where I found Mr. Armiger below talking with my wife, but being offended with him for his leaving of my brother Tom I shewed him no countenance, but did take notice of it to him plainly, and I perceive he was troubled at it, but I am glad I told him of it. Then (when he was gone) up to write several letters by the post, and so to set my papers and things in order, and to bed. This morning we agreed upon some things to answer to the Duke about the practice of striking of the flags, which will now put me upon finishing my resolution of writing something upon the subject.

I expect no pen
to offend, no notice
to trouble.

Then when to write?

Let the paper
agree upon
the writing.


Erasure poem derived from The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Thursday 9 January 1661/62.

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