Kenosis

Among my workmen this morning. By and by by water to Westminster with Commissioner Pett (landing my wife at Black Friars) where I hear the prisoners in the Tower that are to die are come to the Parliament-house this morning.
To the Wardrobe to dinner with my Lady; where a civitt cat, parrot, apes, and many other things are come from my Lord by Captain Hill, who dined with my Lady with us to-day. Thence to the Paynter’s, and am well pleased with our pictures. So by coach home, where I found the joyners putting up my chimney-piece in the dining-room, which pleases me well, only the frame for a picture they have made so massy and heavy that I cannot tell what to do with it.
This evening came my she cozen Porter to see us (the first time that we had seen her since we came to this end of the town) and after her Mr. Hunt, who both staid with us a pretty while and so went away.
By and by, hearing that Mr. Turner was much troubled at what I do in the office, and do give ill words to Sir W. Pen and others of me, I am much troubled in my mind, and so went to bed; not that I fear him at all, but the natural aptness I have to be troubled at any thing that crosses me.

This morning
I hear the prisoners
that are to die.

I pay for a picture
so heavy, I cannot tell
what to do with it.

I fear the natural
aptness I have
to any cross.


Erasure poem derived from The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Friday 7 February 1661/62.

2 Comments


  1. Whew. Spacious, playful . . . it has a trap door to an abyss somewhere in it. Gotta watch my step. A really fine poem.

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