Reaction

Upon a letter this morning from Mr. Moore, I went to my cozen Turner’s chamber, and there put him drawing a replication to Tom Trice’s answer speedily. So to Whitehall and there met Mr. Moore, and I walked long in Westminster Hall, and thence with him to the Wardrobe to dinner, where dined Mrs. Sanderson, the mother of the maids, and after dinner my Lady and she and I on foot to Pater Noster Row to buy a petticoat against the Queen’s coming for my Lady, of plain satin, and other things; and being come back again, we there met Mr. Nathaniel Crew at the Wardrobe with a young gentleman, a friend and fellow student of his, and of a good family, Mr. Knightly, and known to the Crews, of whom my Lady privately told me she hath some thoughts of a match for my Lady Jemimah. I like the person very well, and he hath 2000l. per annum. Thence to the office, and there we sat, and thence after writing letters to all my friends with my Lord at Portsmouth, I walked to my brother Tom’s to see a velvet cloak, which I buy of Mr. Moore. It will cost me 8l. 10s.; he bought it for 6l. 10s., but it is worth my money. So home and find all things made clean against to-morrow, which pleases me well. So to bed.

Raw, I answer with war:
another foot coming
for another me

in the night, my private match
like a mouth made clean
against tomorrow.


Erasure poem derived from The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Saturday 17 May 1662.

Leave a Reply