L’après-midi

(Lord’s day). Up by four o’clock, and to the settling of my own accounts, and I do find upon my monthly ballance, which I have undertaken to keep from month to month, that I am worth 650l., the greatest sum that ever I was yet master of. I pray God give me a thankfull, spirit, and care to improve and encrease it.
To church with my wife, who this day put on her green petticoat of flowred satin, with fine white and gimp lace of her own putting on, which is very pretty. Home with Sir W. Pen to dinner by appointment, and to church again in the afternoon, and then home, Mr. Shepley coming to me about my Lord’s accounts, and in the evening parted, and we to supper again to Sir W. Pen. Whatever the matter is, he do much fawn upon me, and I perceive would not fall out with me, and his daughter mighty officious to my wife, but I shall never be deceived again by him, but do hate him and his traitorous tricks with all my heart. It was an invitation in order to his taking leave of us to-day, he being to go for Ireland in a few days.
So home and prayers, and to bed.

green afternoon
and the fawn is off again
an art of being


Erasure haiku derived from The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Sunday 29 June 1662.

2 Comments


    1. Or faon, as the case may be. (Can you believe it took me more than two hours to settle on that lame little haiku?)

      Reply

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