oh (ô) by Raôul Duguay

This entry is part 22 of 33 in the series Poetry from the Other Americas

A translation of a pyramid poem by Québécois poet, writer, artist, and musician Raôul (or Raöul) Duguay. I’m not sure quite what to make of it, but I do like the chords and discords that result from reading it out loud. It comes across as a sort of Lucky’s speech from ‘Godot’ without any syntactical architecture!

oh
ah ah
mine thine
yes          no
all       nothing
flower        nettle
bird               viper
universe              cell
order a             disorder
starfishy                nebula
atom    bread      butter   fire
air    freedom    water   slavery
sun        field       town         alley
plane       earth         globe       lunar
light       garden     shadow      asphalt
tree    delight    day    night   tear   fear
house     table     wheat   room     province
state   stone     weather     space     particles
east      full     love      west    empty    hunger
smile      caress      you       him      fear      work
luck   spring   someone   theirs  muscles  iron   foot
hand   breast   sweet woman  sex   arms   wife    rock
heart  essence  thirst   faith    flesh   existence   prison
light   summer    leaf    juice    autumn    plastic   concrete
mountain     horse       pathway      valley       car     cement
egg    hatching     health    mother     bomb     blood      scratch
music    star    snow    pine  tree     cry     sleep     twilight    law
color rhythm butterfly game earthworm grey speed stop wolfpack
dance    wave    ocean    shoreline   salt   accident   face    foam   slide
singing  prayer speaking book sun  machine radio television plan caress
drawing     line    curve    volume    step    building    silver   electricity   go
fruit   vegetable    milk   honey  cereals   hot  dog  hamburger  steak  potatoes
child   woman   beauty   peace   MAN   MAN   animal   vegetable   mineral  moved

Due to the difficulty of having a poem formatted in HTML appear the same in all environments, we present an alternate version in image form below:

oh by Raôul Duguay

Here’s the original (not to be confused with another Duguay pyramid poem of the same title):

ô
a  a
ma ta
oui  non
tout  rien
fleur   ortie
oiseau  vipère
univers   cellule
ordre un désordre
astérisme nébuleuse
atome pain beurre feu
air  liberté   eau  esclave
soleil  champ   ville   ruelle
planète  terre   globe  lunaire
lumière  jardin  ombre  asphalte
arbre   joie   jour   nuit  pleur  peur
maison  table  blé   chambre  province
pays  pierre  temps  espace   poussières
orient   plein   amour  occident  vide  faim
sourire    caresse   toi   lui    crainte   travail
bonheur  printemps  on eux  muscles  fer pied
main sein femme bonté sexe bras femme roche
coeur  essence  soif   foi  corps  existence   prison
lumière   feuille  été  jus   automne  plastique  béton
montagne  cheval  sentiers   vallée   automobile  ciment
oeuf  éclosion  santé  maman  bombe explosion sang bobo
musique   étoile  neige  sapin   cri  sommeil  crépuscule  loi
couleur  rythme   papillon   jeu  ver  gris  vitesse  stop meute
danse  vague  océan  rivage  sel  accident   visage  écume  coulée
chant prière parole  livre sol machine radio télévision  plancaresse
dessin   ligne  courbe   volume  pas  building   argent   électricité  go
fruit  légume  lait   miel  céréales  hot dog   hamburger  steak   patates
enfant femme  beauté paix HOMME HOMME animal végétal minéral  mû
Series Navigation← Mapping a different star: five poems by Gabriela MistralRepetición de mi mismo / Repeating Myself by Ricardo Mazó →
Posted in , ,
Initially wooed by the First World War poets and then seduced by the Beats, Dick Jones has been exploring the vast territories in between since the age of 15. Work has been published in a number of magazines, print and online, including Orbis, The Interpreter’s House, Poetry Ireland Review, Qarrtsiluni, Westwords, Mipoesias, Three Candles, Other Poetry, Rattlesnake and Ouroboros Review. In 2010 Dick received a Pushcart nomination for his poem "Sea Of Stars" and his first collection, Ancient Lights, was published by Phoenicia Publishing in 2012. His translation of Blaise Cendrars’ iconoclastic epic poem "La Prose du Transsibérien…", illustrated by Natalie d’Arbeloff, was published in a specialist edition by The Old Stile Press in 2015. For fun and modest profit he plays bass guitar in blues roots-and-shoots trio Broke Down Engine and in song-writing trio Moorby Jones.

Leave a Reply