Woodrat Podcast 2: Elizabeth Adams and “Odes to Tools”

This entry is part 26 of 31 in the series Odes to Tools

A conversation with Beth Adams about books, publishing, and music

In which I am flabbergasted by Beth’s secret plot to rescue some of my poems from a purely digital existence and give them a better life in print north of the border. We talk about the pitfalls of self-plagiarism, what writers can learn from musicians, the ins and outs of small publishing, and what the hell is up with chalk-line reels that aren’t blue. I read a few of the odes, and manage a plausible-sounding explanation for what I was thinking when I came up with the series.

Links:

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Series Navigation← Ode to a Wire BrushNew Odes to Tools review by Noel Sloboda →

15 Comments



  1. Oops, posted too soon. Feel free to delete the 1st comment.

    I enjoyed Episode 2. What a cool surprise to receive a book like that. I’ll look forward to reading it when it comes out.

    The interview format for the podcast was a nice expansion from last week. I enjoyed the turns the conversation took.

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    1. Isn’t it, though? I love the photo of the angel with broken-off fingers, and the back-cover photo is one of the best examples of selective coloring in an otherwise black-and-white photo I’ve seen. I only regret it’s a going to be a little CD booklet (rather than, say, a very extravagent LP).

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  2. And I also need to add that this was a very interesting conversation. Thank you for sharing it. And congratulations on having such friends!

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  3. Looking forward to giving ode to tools to a carpenter friend of mine who is in need of a renewed appreciation for his own craft.

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  4. Finally listened to this (listening to casts is so fun but it takes so much time!) I’ve toyed with the idea of “publishing” Cibola at Lulu, or some such, just because I really want to read it as a physical book, in my hands. The two things stopping me being that I don’t know enough to edit it properly and that I’m too lazy. But your stuff seems to elicit this impulse, Dave!

    Anyway, at least I’ll have the Tools, thanks to Beth!

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    1. Ack! Please don’t publish Cibola! If you want a printed copy, I believe there are web services that specialize in one-off books.

      Being too lazy is a huge impediment for me getting more of this kind of thing done, too. I mean, as I said in the podcast, I was never opposed to making a “Words on the Street” collection, just not sufficiently motivated. Because when you get right down to it, it’s always more fun to write new blog posts, poems, or whatever than to fiddle with the old ones.

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  5. Not to worry, I wouldn’t do such a thing without warning, let alone without permission. It’s really a magnificent poem, though, and I don’t know of anything like it. (Which doesn’t mean much, since I basically have no idea what’s been written since about 1910. But still.)

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    1. Well, as always, I am honored by your attention to my work.

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  6. Dang, good to hear voices associated with names first learned and known–what–6-7 years ago? Thanks, Dave, for podcasting help this week, some hurdles passed, some yet to grapple with. Sent my son (who FINALLY after years of wanting one got a banjo for Christmas) your banjo poems.

    Take care, you two…

    Fred

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    1. Hey Fred – Glad to help. I’ll be following your podcasting advneture with great interest. Good to hear you’ll have a banjo player in the family!

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