Hi Robb. Sounds as if Wisconsin was a corrupting influence on you, then. :)

Interestingly, the Wikipedia says the word petrichor — “the scent of rain on dry earth” — was coined by two scientists from down under.

The term was coined in 1964 by two Australian researchers, Bear and Thomas, for an article in the journal Nature. In the article, the authors describe how the smell derives from an oil exuded by certain plants during dry periods, whereupon it is absorbed by clay-based soils and rocks. During rain, the oil is released into the air along with another compound, geosmin, a metabolic by-product of bacteria, which is emitted by wet soil, producing the distinctive scent; ozone may also be present if there is lightning. In a follow-up paper, Bear and Thomas (1965) showed that the oil retards seed germination and early plant growth.

Fascinating, eh?