Ohio man accused of killing wife with banjos

found poem from Cox News Service

A 63-year-old man bludgeoned his wife to death
yesterday morning with a pair of banjos, deputies said.

“I’ve been an officer for 30 years, and that’s
the first banjo killing I’ve seen,” said
Miami County Chief Deputy Charles Price.
Edward Benson has been charged with aggravated murder
and was being held in the Miami County Jail in lieu
of $50,000 cash bond. Mr. Price said

Mr. Benson beat his wife, Katie, with the musical instruments
in their home about 5 a.m. “She was beaten with
a banjo in the head. When it was destroyed,
a second banjo was used,” Mr. Price said.

The woman died en route to Stouder
Memorial Hospital in Troy. She suffered
massive head injuries, Mr. Price said.

Authorities aren’t sure what led
to the beating. Mr. Price said

deputies hadn’t had any other domestic
violence complaints at the home in recent years.
Deputies were dispatched to the scene at 5:01 a.m.
after Mr. Benson phoned 911, saying

his wife was in need of paramedics.
Mr. Benson also immediately called an attorney, who
arrived at the scene and advised him not to answer
investigators’ questions. Neighbors said

they didn’t hear any disturbances from
the home yesterday. They were awakened
by deputies. Ralph Wolfe, whose house is
in front of the Bensons’, said

Mr. Benson had told him he played the banjo
in a bluegrass band. The Bensons had seven adult children
and many grandchildren. They lived alone.
Mr. Benson had medical problems that prevented him
from working, deputies and neighbors said.

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6 Comments


    1. Yes, precisely. This happened back in 1991, so there isn’t a whole lot about it on the web that I could find, just another, brief story from half a year later saying that the court had found him incompetent to stand trial, and that he had been committed to a mental institution.

      Reply

  1. Dave I deal with the daughter of the victim of this crime at the pawn shop I work at! If you want more information I may be able to get you an interview with the daughter.

    Reply

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