Death of the amateur

Up, and it being yesterday and to-day a great thaw it is not for a man to walk the streets, but took coach and to Mr. Povy’s, and there meeting all of us again agreed upon an answer to the Lords by and by, and thence we did come to Exeter House, and there was a witness of most [base] language against Mr. Povy, from my Lord Peterborough, who is most furiously angry with him, because the other, as a foole, would needs say that the 26,000l. was my Lord Peterborough’s account, and that he had nothing to do with it.
The Lords did find fault also with our answer, but I think really my Lord Ashly would fain have the outside of an Exchequer, but when we come better to be examined. So home by coach, with my Lord Barkeley, who, by his discourse, I find do look upon Mr. Coventry as an enemy, but yet professes great justice and pains.
I at home after dinner to the office, and there sat all the afternoon and evening, and then home to supper and to bed.
Memorandum. This day and yesterday, I think it is the change of the weather, I have a great deal of pain, but nothing like what I use to have. I can hardly keep myself loose, but on the contrary am forced to drive away my pain. Here I am so sleepy I cannot hold open my eyes, and therefore must be forced to break off this day’s passages more shortly than I would and should have done.
This day was buried (but I could not be there) my cozen Percivall Angier; and yesterday I received the newes that Dr. Tom Pepys is dead, at Impington, for which I am but little sorry, not only because he would have been troublesome to us, but a shame to his family and profession; he was such a coxcomb.

I walk the streets with nothing
to do but think outside

I weather myself
so sleepy I cannot hold open my eyes

and must be buried
in some profession


Erasure poem derived from The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Thursday 19 January 1665.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.