Kneading

From the first fist into
the risen mass, the dough
is a-hiss. To live is
to master a liturgy
of winds — even yeast
knows this. Gas
whispers out through
a thousand pinholes as
I fold & press, fold
& press that limit-
less quilt.

*

Written for the RWP vowel prompt. Other responses may be found here.

19 Comments


  1. Guilt is a strong force in one’s life and can be folded many times before it disappears, if at all. Nice use of the prompt. Have a great night.

    Reply

    1. Thanks. That gives me a good idea of how to expand this poem, if I do.

      Reply

  2. absolutely love this, Dave – especially your use of hard “is” and “iss” sounds.

    “To live is
    to master a liturgy
    of winds — even yeast
    knows this”.

    Beautiful.

    Reply

      1. Dave picked out my favorite. What a great line. Interesting how it came out of such a prompt.

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        1. It came later than the first draft, I can tell you that much. I guess the reason I don’t write to prompts too often is they force me to reverse my usual procedure of idea first, writing afterwards.

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  3. I concur with Dave. This is beautiful.

    Poetry is where you find it.

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    1. Thanks, but in this case, I just found it in the sound of words. Which is O.K., I guess.

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  4. the “s” sound compliments the “i” throughout, set up by “hiss.” very nice! and i love thinking of even those air bubbles caused by yeast as wind. the mention of liturgy makes the whole piece — and the act of making bread — a prayer.

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  5. I like this, dave, especially because I’m the bread maker here. I always use the Tassajara Bread Book recipe, and find bread making meditative, like a zen practice. My breath, the bread’s rising, folding in on each other.

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    1. Hi robin. I’d like to say I find it meditative, too — if meditation includes spacing out while listening to loud music. :)

      Reply

  6. Simple and elegant. Interesting that Michelle read the last line as “guilt”, it’s “quilt”, right? But strangely, they both work, although with rather different meanings.

    Reply

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