Give Me Your Ravaged, Your Ruined

Oh what charming ruins
the inhabitants must be—
snaggletoothed and ravaged
from “Provincial” by Dave Bonta

A bloodied sock, a nail-hole punched
through the sole of it. Mister
Cottonwood, please leave it here
with me. While you are away dancing
two days earlier than your doctor
recommends upon that foot you injured

sweeping up after the job at Mrs.
Blattner’s, I’d like to take that
sock and throw it, with its mate
(still whole but worn thin at heel
and toe), into the laundry. It is
a myth that there are elves that

live invisibly behind the scenes
in every laundry room. They’ve never
been in mine. (Perhaps they do exist
in other people’s dryers, that is not
for me to say…I can only speak
to the error of saying “every”.)

But here in this laundry room, there
are several piles of socks:

  • socks that are half of a pair, where
    they and their partners were separated
    in the hamper, and went through the wash
    in different loads (they are waiting)
  • socks that are widowed, their partners
    worn through, no longer strong enough
    to serve as barrier between tender
    foot-soles and tough footwear (they are
    waiting too, to be matched to another
    like them, similar in style and purpose,
    waiting to be re-paired)
  • socks that have fulfilled the purpose
    of their life as socks and can serve
    no further in that role (they are
    not to be discarded, they are waiting
    for some purpose they may serve).
    See, Mister Cottonwood? Your puncture
    will be washed, then will reside here.

A makeshift glove to cover the hand
that wipes fresh creek-mud off
the puppy’s feet? A soft lint-free cloth
for applying hoof-care liniment
to the pastured horse? A clean layer
between the bag of frozen peas-and-
carrots and the skin to prevent frost-
biting when an inconvenient twist

of the wrist has happened that needs
some short-term icing? A gathering
of several members of this sock-pile
community to be entrusted, one atop
the other, to protect the outdoor
spigots in the hardest part of winter?
A mini-mop for the kitchen floor when
the salsa’s boiling becomes exuberant?

Reincarnation happens here, Mister
Cottonwood. Do not discard any
candidates. All may be re-purposed.

In response to “Mrs. Blattner’s Window” by Joe Cottonwood, title a nod to Emma Lazarus.

Series Navigation← Washing InstructionsLaundry Poem #10: Tailored to Fit →


  1. So wise, thrifty, and practical…every household needs rags, a second life for outworn clothes..


  2. My socks are in good hands with you. Thanks for the cleansing of my sole. Sorry about the hole.
    May old socks wave atop fence posts like prayer flags in the breeze.


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