Solastalgia

Up and with Sir W. Batten and Sir W. Pen to White Hall, where we did our business with the Duke. Thence I to Westminster Hall and walked up and down. Among others Ned Pickering met me and tells me how active my Lord is at sea, and that my Lord Hinchingbroke is now at Rome, and, by all report, a very noble and hopefull gentleman.
Thence to Mr. Povy’s, and there met Creed, and dined well after his old manner of plenty and curiosity. But I sat in pain to think whether he would begin with me again after dinner with his enquiry after my bill, but he did not, but fell into other discourse, at which I was glad, but was vexed this morning meeting of Creed at some bye questions that he demanded of me about some such thing, which made me fear he meant that very matter, but I perceive he did not.
Thence to visit my Lady Sandwich and so to a Tangier Committee, where a great company of the new Commissioners, Lords, that in behalfe of my Lord Bellasses are very loud and busy and call for Povy’s accounts, but it was a most sorrowful thing to see how he answered to questions so little to the purpose, but to his owne wrong. All the while I sensible how I am concerned in my bill of 100l. and somewhat more. So great a trouble is fear, though in a case that at the worst will bear enquiry.
My Lord Barkeley was very violent against Povy. But my Lord Ashly, I observe, is a most clear man in matters of accounts, and most ingeniously did discourse and explain all matters. We broke up, leaving the thing to a Committee of which I am one. Povy, Creed, and I staid discoursing, I much troubled in mind seemingly for the business, but indeed only on my own behalf, though I have no great reason for it, but so painfull a thing is fear.
So after considering how to order business, Povy and I walked together as far as the New Exchange and so parted, and I by coach home. To the office a while, then to supper and to bed.
This afternoon Secretary Bennet read to the Duke of Yorke his letters, which say that Allen has met with the Dutch Smyrna fleet at Cales, and sunk one and taken three. How true or what these ships are time will show, but it is good newes and the newes of our ships being lost is doubted at dales and Malaga. God send it false!

where the sea is now
we would meet
out in the sand

where that busy and sorrowful
answer to questions
was most clear

we broke up leaving it
so painful a thing
to be sunk


Erasure poem derived from The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Monday 16 January 1665.

2 Comments


  1. This is lovely, Dave. It’s truly amazing how you find these poems in the text. Perfect title for the rising sea levels evoked in the poem.

    Reply

    1. Thanks, Christine. This entry was really the perfect length for an erasure: long enough to have plenty of possibilities, but short enough to still force me out of my comfort zone. It’s such a pleasure to write these things, I don’t know what I’ll do when the diary ends!

      Reply

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