Assignations

Lay pretty long in bed, and then up and to the office, where we met on extraordinary occasion about the business of tickets. By and by to the ‘Change, and there did several businesses, among others brought home my cozen Pepys, whom I appointed to be here to-day, and Mr. Moore met us upon the business of my Lord’s bond. Seeing my neighbour Mr. Knightly walk alone from the ‘Change, his family being not yet come to town, I did invite him home with me, and he dined with me, a very sober, pretty man he is. He is mighty solicitous, as I find many about the City that live near the churchyards, to have the churchyards covered with lime, and I think it is needfull, and ours I hope will be done. Good pleasant discourse at dinner of the practices of merchants to cheate the “Customers,” occasioned by Mr. Moore’s being with much trouble freed of his prize goods, which he bought, which fell into the Customers’ hands, and with much ado hath cleared them. Mr. Knightly being gone, my cozen Pepys and Moore and I to our business, being the clearing of my Lord Sandwich’s bond wherein I am bound with him to my cozen for 1000l. I have at last by my dexterity got my Lord’s consent to have it paid out of the money raised by his prizes. So the bond is cancelled, and he paid by having a note upon Sir Robert Viner, in whose hands I had lodged my Lord’s money, by which I am to my extraordinary comfort eased of a liablenesse to pay the sum in case of my Lord’s death, or troubles in estate, or my Lord’s greater fall, which God defend!
Having settled this matter at Sir R. Viner’s, I took up Mr. Moore (my cozen going home) and to my Lord Chancellor’s new house which he is building, only to view it, hearing so much from Mr. Evelyn of it; and, indeed, it is the finest pile I ever did see in my life, and will be a glorious house. Thence to the Duke of Albemarle, who tells me Mr. Coventry is come to town and directs me to go to him about some business in hand, whether out of displeasure or desire of ease I know not; but I asked him not the reason of it but went to White Hall, but could not find him there, though to my great joy people begin to bustle up and down there, the King holding his resolution to be in towne to-morrow, and hath good encouragement, blessed be God! to do so, the plague being decreased this week to 56, and the total to 227.
So after going to the Swan in the Palace, and sent for Spicer to discourse about my last Tangier tallys that have some of the words washed out with the rain, to have them new writ, I home, and there did some business and at the office, and so home to supper, and to bed.

we met nightly
in that church red with need

to free our hands of death
building only to go bust

holding on
blessed as a swan in the palace

our last words washed out
with the rain


Erasure poem derived from The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Wednesday 31 January 1666.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.