Self-portrait of the soul, running out of time

Remembering our dead, we’re told to fill
a plate of food, pour   
                      a cup to set
on the sill or under an alcove light.
But years pass
        until the logic  
of the empty bowl with its celadon sheen 
                       seems a more
honest gesture: the shorn
branch, the broken cistern, water
                             going nowhere
but back into the ground along idle chains.
Their faces are fixed in that last
darkness— as I imagine mine
                       will be, folded
away into the first or last
layer like an artichoke. 
                     It takes a while
to get the hang of peeling apart
the armor: one leaf at a time
                   until there’s nothing
left but that small mouthful of
tenderness. After that, even the voice
            disappears. Nothing, 
after all, is inexhaustible. What I give
now— advice, a loan, a payment; 
         judgment, confidence, comfort—
teeters in that traitorous
interval of too little
and too much. Little soul, if only
                       I knew 
what it really meant to journey;
             if only I could still be here
                    for my own
rescue, for that untrammeled taste.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.